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Common to almost all models is that the handling is more responsive than on a full-size bike, and that can take some getting used to. It is not advised that you ride a folding bike with no hands or try any cute stunts. Gears on small-wheeled folding bikes are higher to compensate, but limited gearing on some models may slow you down. If that is a major concern for you, you might want to look more toward higher end "performance" folding bikes. If you plan to take a lot of trips that utilize transit, a bike that folds quickly and compactly may be best for you. If you are a tall rider, you may want to check out how each type of folding bike can adjust to fit you.
Many folding bikes feature internal hub gears – this means that the shifting system is entirely sealed, cutting down on maintenance dramatically. Shifting on hub gears is often easier for beginners, as there is no chain tension to worry about. In addition, there’s no chance of the system being bent or damaged –  a risk when left unattended on a busy train. If you want multiple chainrings and a wide spread of gears, you will need to opt for a derailleur system.
The average speed of a folding e-bike is 25 mph. Even though the speed of 20 mph is only allowed in America, it is easier to pedal which can allow you to speed up. This average speed can take you up to 50 miles. With an electric bike, the battery is all that keeps it going so if your battery is fully charged and working then this speed can be reached in no time. It will help you ride from home to your work without stopping.
Electric bikes are here in a big way. Liberated from some of the normal constraints of standard bike design like weight and gearing, e-bike design has exploded; if you can imagine it, someone has built it. From cargo bikes to city bikes, messenger bikes to mountain bikes, road bikes, and even beach cruisers, there is something for everyone. The beauty of e-bikes is they make the joy of cycling accessible to so many people in so many ways.
Bikes may partly fold and partly disassemble for packing into a standard or custom sized suitcase for air travel (e.g., Airnimal and Bike Friday). Other variations include: Bicycle Torque Coupling, a proprietary connector system that can be retrofitted to a standard frame; the Gekko, which folds from the seat tube like an upside down umbrella; the Giatex, which folds and retracts, adjusting to the size of the rider; the iXi, which literally breaks into two halves; and the Strida, which has a triangular frame and folds to resemble a unicycle.
What the Link B7 doesn’t have, however, are a rack and fenders, which come standard on both the Dahon Mariner and the Tern Link D8; you can purchase them from Tern separately for $35 and $40, respectively, but they will of course add about 2 pounds to the nearly 27 pounds the bike already weighs (and unless you’re really bike-handy, you’ll also pay a mechanic—$45, give or take—to install them). The Link B7 also feels more sluggish than the Mariner D8 and Link D8: The gearing definitely isn’t calibrated for speed. On the Queensboro Bridge, I pedaled uphill comfortably in a middle gear, and I sometimes thought that the hardest gear (which is meant for going fast on level ground, not for climbing) wasn’t enough for zipping along on flats or slight declines (we’re talking 15 or so miles per hour—I’m no speed demon). One last note: The bike I tested was the 2017 model, which is now sold out. The company says that the 2018 model, which will be available in early September 2017, is what’s called a carry-forward model—it’ll be identical to the previous year’s.
If you have very little storage space and love to bring your bike on vacations, you should look at the Goplus Electric Folding Bike. It has a powerful battery that’s removable and allows you to go up to 30 km per charge. To fully charge the battery, you’d need about 5 to 6 hours. It charges easily, and its charger is UL approved for safety. The bike is made of aluminum alloy with the front fork made of high-strength carbon steel. It features a quick release clamp that allows you to fold the bike quickly and easily. The bike weighs 55lbs, and when folded, it measures 33’’x26’’x14’’ (LxHxW). Both front and rear brakes are reliable and guarantee safety. The seat height is adjustable, so you can go up or down a size if you’re maybe sharing the bike with someone else. The bike comes partially assembled, and if you’re not a professional, I suggest you have someone help you with tightening everything into place.

It's my 1st electric bike so I don't know what really to expect but one thing I do know is that this thing moves. I use it to commute to work over the Williamsburg bridge. 15 min bike ride compared to 35min on a given day on the train and the assistance help me to stay cool and dry with minimal work. I am very impressed with the quality as well. One thing to note, this bike is heavy. Once folded you won't be carrying this no where. It's at least 50lbs. And where the carrying bar is located it makes it difficult.

The Mariner D8 comes with fenders and a rear rack that has a nicely designed clip-on bungee cord so you don’t have to buy or hunt for something else to use; for my eight-block ride home, it held a 4-pound bag of dog food securely in place. If you plan to use panniers with the Mariner D8’s rear rack, Dahon recommends using front panniers, which are usually smaller, to avoid heel strike when you’re pedaling; if you want to try using larger panniers on the rack, we recommend taking the bike with you while shopping, or at least taking careful measurements. The D8 also has bolt holes for a front carrier attachment, should you prefer to outfit it with a so-designed front bag or basket.

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I unboxed, assembled (if needed), adjusted, and assessed each bike for my initial impressions, taking them all on a short first ride around my neighborhood in Queens. In a few cases, the bikes needed more extensive adjustments, for which I brought them to Nomad Cycle in Astoria; if you buy a bike online, you should bring it to a mechanic for a once-over, no matter what.
The average speed of a folding e-bike is 25 mph. Even though the speed of 20 mph is only allowed in America, it is easier to pedal which can allow you to speed up. This average speed can take you up to 50 miles. With an electric bike, the battery is all that keeps it going so if your battery is fully charged and working then this speed can be reached in no time. It will help you ride from home to your work without stopping.
E-bikes are classed according to the power that their electric motor can deliver and the control system, i.e., when and how the power from the motor is applied. Also the classification of e-bikes is complicated as much of the definition is due to legal reasons of what constitutes a bicycle and what constitutes a moped or motorcycle. As such, the classification of these e-bikes varies greatly across countries and local jurisdictions.
Want to read about more folding bikes? A buyer's guide to a wider selection of folding bikes appeared in A2B Magazine and is available here. Another more detailed buyer's guide is published by the Folding Society and is available here. The Folding Society is probably the single most detailed Web site on the subject of folding bikes and should be able to give you the answer to almost any question. Also take a look at

We’ve updated the section on our upgrade pick, the Brompton S6L, to include information about Brompton’s recent voluntary recall. The company says that the recall is more of a safety precaution than a reaction to reported injuries or experiences of compromised quality. We’re still confident that the Brompton S6L is the best upgrade choice for a folding bike.
Batteries are the core part of a folding electric bike and if chosen poorly can turn your expensive e-bike into a waste. There are many batteries with different properties. But the most recommended battery for your folding e-bike is the lithium manganese battery. They are the best and are used even more than the lithium-ion ones. They generate high power and do not require a lot of maintenance.
DAHON bikes unfold the world around you, with two wheels and all kinds of ingenious technology. Suddenly ‘too far’ or ‘too big’ is not the issue, and the question becomes ‘where to next?’ Go the extra mile, your way. Folding bikes come in all variations to fit right on into your lifestyle, be it the urban commute, where you fold right on up into the office, or a weekend away with bikes for the family all stashed in your trunk. We’ve got you covered. Filter and find your ride over on the Bikes page.
E-bikes mostly use motors and battery options from a few major suppliers: Bosch, Yamaha, Shimano, and Brose. A few other brands exist, but are less reliable or powerful. Some, like the Yamaha system, have more torque and others are quieter. But generally all four make good options. Look for motor output (in watts) which will give you an idea of total power. But watt hours (Wh) is perhaps a better figure to use—it takes into account battery output and life to give a truer reflection of power.
Dahon builds the Boardwalk S1 with a single-speed drivetrain and 20-inch wheels to keep things simple. The Boardwalk S1 includes both a coaster brake and linear-pull front brake for easy stopping. Despite its sturdy steel frame, the whole package weighs in at just 27.6 pounds (about the same as a mountain bike). Stash it at your beach house or slide it into your apartment’s front closet for quick escapes. Price not available.
Hello, I live in a small apartment and was wondering what type of folder you would recommend for me. I’ve recently retired and have health problems which include Diabetes 2, irregular heartbeat, and a weakened left leg from polio as a child. I would like to take the bike to the store, post office, around town to shop, and to pay bills. I would eventually like to travel up to 6 miles but for right now 3 would do. There are a number of mounds or hills and one steep one that I avoid by jumping in the car when I have an errand to run over there. Do you think battery powered electric bikes would be more suitable. It would make climbing a mound possible without having to demount and walk. Perhaps, there’s a non-pedelec that would work that you about which you know. I’m nearly 250 pounds and 5 feet 6 inches tall and quite out-of-shape. I would like to sit closer to the ground in case of a fall or injury, maybe out of fear, due to the weakened leg muscles. By the way I live in a tourist town that is well-known for its climate, the Boardwalk and its university-Santa Cruz, California. I’m not sure how many gears/speed the bike should have, especially for the purposes of climbing hills. Forgot to mention I’m 67 years old soon to be 68. Please provide me with a couple of choices you think might work. Don’t know if a full-size would be better but I like the stand-over position of a folder as I worry about that bar of the frame being there and complicating a fall.
E-bike usage worldwide has experienced rapid growth since 1998. In 2016 there were 210 million electric bikes worldwide used daily.[33] It is estimated that there were roughly 120 million e-bikes in China in early 2010, and sales are expanding rapidly in India, the United States of America, Germany, the Netherlands,[2] and Switzerland.[34] A total of 700,000 e-bikes were sold in Europe in 2010, up from 200,000 in 2007 and 500,000 units in 2009.[35]
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