I just received my Swaggy Bike and was so exited, I had delusional grandeur thinking of all the places in proximity I can actually visit on Google map. It came packaged with instructions however, I used every curse word in the book trying to get the seat installed. Thanks to the video Jack posted on here, I was able to stop and restart watching 5+ times and see how he went about the whole process. I glared at it while it was charging and even thought I'd get on for my neice. Then...the moment of reality kicked in. I made sure to READ the manual front to back being that I spent an insane amount of money for this particular model...Took it for my first spin, and the rear tire popped off the real well??So.....I called the toll free number and was greeted by a less then concerned Rep in ... full review
Folding bikes are often uncomfortable for taller riders. Not so with the 3OND. The seat and stem can extend far out of the bike, accommodating all but the tallest people. As always, be aware of extending the stem too far. You do not want to stress the cables when turning. Adding to the comfort is a basic suspension fork. Although you cannot adjust the rebound or preload, it does have a lockout option.
The 20” wheels run on puncture resistant Kenda tires. Keeping you comfortable when riding is a suspension fork, a rear shock, and a seat shock. With the huge range on offer, you may want to take the GB5 500 on some big rides, so this added comfort will be welcome. Even if you just use it for commuting, the smooth ride from the pothole-eating suspension will keep you smiling.
You see, I’m not really a cyclist. It’s not that I’m lazy or out of shape. I run between 3 to 5 miles a day and could pedal if I wanted to. It’s just that I generally think of electric bicycles more like little electric motorcycles that don’t require me to get a motorcycle license or pay for insurance or registration. They’re for getting around quickly and effortlessly.
I am 6'1" and weigh about 240. I got a bit over 6 plus continuous miles on a full charge on rolling hills. If you are using them as a form of transportation around towns as we are, I would do some experimenting on how much distance you get per charge in the type of terrain you are riding. Based on the load and terrain it is in line with what I expected. With a bit of planning they do the job. Maybe at some point they will add a conversion kit to ... full review
Is it light enough? Make sure the folding bike you choose is light enough for you to easily carry around. Granted, you’ll be riding it much of the time, but you may have to hold it while on public transit or haul it up the stairs to your office or apartment. Some of the lightest folding bikes weigh under 10 pounds, but notably, they tend to cost more.
This eco-friendly bike is completely electric and emissions-free. If you care about the environment but still want to enjoy easy commuting, consider this bike. The Swagatron SwagCycle uses a 36V battery and a 250W motor that allow you to go up to 10mph. The battery takes about 2.5 hours to charge, and you can go up to 10 miles before having to recharge it. The frame is made of aerospace grade aluminum and folds into a compact size. It’s ideal if you struggle with storage space since it can fit pretty much anywhere. The handlebar display shows you the battery life and allows you to honk the horn, turn on the headlight, and brake and accelerate. One of the coolest things about this bike is that it features a USB charging port for charging all your gadgets and devices. However, note that this bike doesn’t have any pedal assist mode. Also, SwagCycle comes with a battery charger and user instructions that help you with the assembly.
Torque sensors and power controls were developed in the late 1990s. For example, Takada Yutky of Japan filed a patent in 1997 for such a device. In 1992 Vector Services Limited offered and sold an e-bike dubbed Zike.[9] The bicycle included NiCd batteries that were built into a frame member and included an 850 g permanent-magnet motor. Despite the Zike, in 1992 hardly any commercial e-bikes were available.

The average speed of a folding e-bike is 25 mph. Even though the speed of 20 mph is only allowed in America, it is easier to pedal which can allow you to speed up. This average speed can take you up to 50 miles. With an electric bike, the battery is all that keeps it going so if your battery is fully charged and working then this speed can be reached in no time. It will help you ride from home to your work without stopping.
I’ve been riding bikes around New York City for more than a decade and commuting regularly from Astoria to Manhattan via the Queensboro Bridge to my job as a personal trainer and fitness instructor. In addition, I was formerly a staff writer for the Good Housekeeping Institute, where I was intimately involved with the scientific testing of all manner of products for the magazine and website.
I found the $49 optional thumb throttle to be very useful. It’s a great way to get yourself easily out of a mess like deep sand or mud, while walking alongside the bike. It’s also useful when you want to make a quick start from a stop light without having to shift into a lower gear, or when you’re feeling lazy and want to cruise along without peddling.
Electric Bikes and Scooters have become the go to method of transportation for anyone looking for a healthy, eco-friendly way to get to work, school or anywhere within a 30 mile radius. With over 120 models from over 40 different manufactures to choose from, you'll be sure to find the right Electric Bike or Electric Scooter for you. We offer E-bikes only from the highest rated brands, including bikes from QuietKat, Populo, E-Joe, Juiced and more. We live, breath and ride electric bikes so don't be afraid to contact our experts today for guidance on picking the right one for your needs. Our bikes are federally classified as electric bikes and not motorized bikes, which means that in most states, you don't need license, registration or insurance. 
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