German designers Heiko Müller and Markus Riese began working on the Birdy in 1992 for their university thesis – the first model comprised of parts of two old bicycles welded together. Fast forward 26 years and the Weiterstadt-based company have mastered the art of folding bikes. With 18-inch wheels for a more stable ride than the Brompton, the Birdy City offers impressive stability and comfort, and its aggressive, sporty geometry means it’s faster than many of its competitors. At 12.8kg, it’s not the lightest model around, but if you’re happy to take that hit in favour of a superior ride it won’t let you down. Eight-speed hub gear, front suspension/rear shocks, disc brakes adjustable-height handlebars and optional rear rollers all tick the right boxes, and although it’s not the smallest fold, it only takes 20 seconds or so to pack it down for the train or trunk.
This eco-friendly bike is completely electric and emissions-free. If you care about the environment but still want to enjoy easy commuting, consider this bike. The Swagatron SwagCycle uses a 36V battery and a 250W motor that allow you to go up to 10mph. The battery takes about 2.5 hours to charge, and you can go up to 10 miles before having to recharge it. The frame is made of aerospace grade aluminum and folds into a compact size. It’s ideal if you struggle with storage space since it can fit pretty much anywhere. The handlebar display shows you the battery life and allows you to honk the horn, turn on the headlight, and brake and accelerate. One of the coolest things about this bike is that it features a USB charging port for charging all your gadgets and devices. However, note that this bike doesn’t have any pedal assist mode. Also, SwagCycle comes with a battery charger and user instructions that help you with the assembly.

Finally, Brompton bikes are customizable, which means you can choose the frame material (steel or a superlight combination of steel and titanium); the handlebar shape (four options); the number of gears (one, two, three, or six) and the gear ratios (three choices); the suspension type; the tire type; the saddle type and height; accessories such as the fenders, rack, front bags, and lights; and the paint color. A single-speed Brompton starts at about $1,200; the one we tested, the S6L, came outfitted with sport-style straight handlebars, six speeds ($220 more), fenders ($80 more), a front carrier block for attaching a bag and a front flap bag ($185 for both, bag not shown), and rechargeable battery-powered lights ($110, not shown), totaling about $1,795.
Montague - this maker offers only full-size folding bikes that are fairly light (around 30 pounds) but have correspondingly large folding sizes (36" x 28" x 12") Prices range from $395 to $645, and a soft carrying bag is an option. If you are looking to avoid the small wheels of some brands and perhaps want a good full-size bike that just happens to fold, this may be a good choice. Montagues fold in 30 seconds without tools.
Prodeco technologies have made an amazing and stylish electric bike. It is created with very high technology. The battery goes up to 720 watts which makes it more reliable. It can go 28-36 mph. The body is covered with lithium powder that makes it rust resistant. The material used is very lightweight and allows easy portability. It is easily foldable. The design of this electric bike is high-class. You will love going to different places and showing off your new and classy bike.
DAHON bikes unfold the world around you, with two wheels and all kinds of ingenious technology. Suddenly ‘too far’ or ‘too big’ is not the issue, and the question becomes ‘where to next?’ Go the extra mile, your way. Folding bikes come in all variations to fit right on into your lifestyle, be it the urban commute, where you fold right on up into the office, or a weekend away with bikes for the family all stashed in your trunk. We’ve got you covered. Filter and find your ride over on the Bikes page.
I’ve been riding bikes around New York City for more than a decade and commuting regularly from Astoria to Manhattan via the Queensboro Bridge to my job as a personal trainer and fitness instructor. In addition, I was formerly a staff writer for the Good Housekeeping Institute, where I was intimately involved with the scientific testing of all manner of products for the magazine and website.
This eco-friendly bike is completely electric and emissions-free. If you care about the environment but still want to enjoy easy commuting, consider this bike. The Swagatron SwagCycle uses a 36V battery and a 250W motor that allow you to go up to 10mph. The battery takes about 2.5 hours to charge, and you can go up to 10 miles before having to recharge it. The frame is made of aerospace grade aluminum and folds into a compact size. It’s ideal if you struggle with storage space since it can fit pretty much anywhere. The handlebar display shows you the battery life and allows you to honk the horn, turn on the headlight, and brake and accelerate. One of the coolest things about this bike is that it features a USB charging port for charging all your gadgets and devices. However, note that this bike doesn’t have any pedal assist mode. Also, SwagCycle comes with a battery charger and user instructions that help you with the assembly.
Beach cruiser fans rejoice with the Raleigh Retroglide iE Step Thru. Cruise the boardwalk with maximum style and minimum effort as you enjoy the perks of a 350 watt motor and a top pedal-assisted speed of 20mph. Enjoy the comfort of an upright riding position thanks to the backswept handlebar and take advantage of the cargo-carrying capacity, thanks to the rear rack, to run errands around town or commute to work. With a claimed range of 35 miles, the Raleigh Retroglide is a great choice for anyone who wants to add a little speed to daily cruise.
I use this to commute to work at about 6-8 miles away. I must say, I love this bike a lot! It looks cool, it’s goes the advertised speed for me at least (I weigh 130lbs) so I have to issue with going the highest speeds. The headlight is really bright, so are the rear/brake/signal lights. This thing is kind of sturdy (so I thought) but after a few rides, the frame ( where it folds up) of the bike is getting loose with each ride.. I’m not sure if I’m able to tighten the frame but I will find out. Other than that it’s a great purchase. Will buy again and recommend anyone looking for something of this price range
I have been thoroughly pleased with my Blix Vika+. I bought it in March, and I commute to work, a 22-mile round trip. I will break my review into a few different components. - Speed and handling: The bike is a real pleasure to ride. I pedal, but I don't have to pedal very hard. Because I am short (5'2"), I find the smaller wheel size and the step-through frame very manageable. It can get quite some speed, too, which is great. - Battery: I can do my 22-mile commute on a single charge, but the bike does get a bit slower on the return journey. If I'd known this, I might have upgraded to the bigger battery. - Folding: The folding and unfolding is pretty straightforward. I have done it many times to throw the bike in the back of a Yaris, and it's pretty simple, even for someone like me who is not mechanically minded. - Weight: The bike is pretty heavy. If you think you might be able to carry it anywhere except to put it in the back of a vehicle, think again. It's just too heavy. But this generally doesn't affect the handling, except sometimes when taking off from being stopped. Nothing too noticeable, though. - Customer service: Blix's customer service is GREAT. They are extremely responsive (I have contacted them online a few times, and they get back to me within a matter of hours) and always answer my questions completely and to my satisfaction. This is a very big plus when you're spending a reasonable amount of money a bike. Overall, I am very happy with my purchase and would recommend a Blix bike to anyone who was looking for an electric bike.
Beach cruiser fans rejoice with the Raleigh Retroglide iE Step Thru. Cruise the boardwalk with maximum style and minimum effort as you enjoy the perks of a 350 watt motor and a top pedal-assisted speed of 20mph. Enjoy the comfort of an upright riding position thanks to the backswept handlebar and take advantage of the cargo-carrying capacity, thanks to the rear rack, to run errands around town or commute to work. With a claimed range of 35 miles, the Raleigh Retroglide is a great choice for anyone who wants to add a little speed to daily cruise.
As a counterbalance to the cute utilitarian bikes above, the Specialized Turbo Levo FSR Comp is a big, bad, and burly mountain bike. With 27.5-inch wheels, massive 2.8-inch tires, 150mm of travel in the front and 135mm of travel in the rear this bike is made to shred. The Specialized 1.3 Rx Trail-Tuned motor is designed specifically for off-road riding and features a double freehweel design that disengages the gear box at top speed to reduce friction while ripping downhill. The low center of gravity and stout parts make this one a relatively nimble handler that is ready for the rowdiest downhills.
In 1941, during the Second World War, the British War Office called for a machine that weighed less than 23 lb (this was not achieved - the final weight was about 32 pounds) and would withstand being dropped by parachute. In response, the Birmingham Small Arms Company (BSA) developed a folding bicycle small enough to be taken in small gliders or on parachute jumps from aircraft.
It makes a lot of sense to put these two technologies together. You can get all the advantages of an electric bike in an easy to transport package. An electric folding bike really is the ultimate solution for commuting. You can let the battery do the hard work and not worry about getting sweaty as you scoot across town to a meeting, or you can arrive at the office faster than with just leg power alone. If part of your journey necessitates taking a train or a bus, all you have to do is fold up the bike and hop on.
Due to the added weight of a motor and battery, electric bikes are heavier than normal bikes. Folding bikes in general tend to be quite weighty because of the folding mechanism. An electric folding bike therefore can be on the heavy side. Consider the weight of the model you are looking at. Are you happy lifting that weight? Will you still be happy lifting that weight at the end of a long day?
Range is a key consideration with e-bikes, and is affected by factors such as motor efficiency, battery capacity, efficiency of the driving electronics, aerodynamics, hills and weight of the bike and rider.[36][37] Some manufacturers, such as the Canadian BionX or American Vintage Electric Bikes,[38] have the option of using regenerative braking, the motor acts as a generator to slow the bike down prior to the brake pads engaging.[39] This is useful for extending the range and the life of brake pads and wheel rims. There are also experiments using fuel cells. e.g. the PHB. Some experiments have also been undertaken with super capacitors to supplement or replace batteries for cars and some SUVS. E-bikes developed in Switzerland in the late 1980s for the Tour de Sol solar vehicle race came with solar charging stations but these were later fixed on roofs and connected so as to feed into the electric mains.[40] The bicycles were then charged from the mains, as is common today. While ebike batteries were produced mainly by bigger companies in past, many small to medium companies have started using innovative new methods for creating more durable batteries. State of the art, custom built automated precision CNC spot welding machines[41] created 18650 battery packs[42] are commonly used among Do-it-yourself ebike makers.
In the event that you're going to be living somewhere for an abbreviated period of time, a folding bike might be a smarter choice than a car, as long as your daily commute isn't too far. For many city dwellers, there is simply no place to park a car where they don't have to worry about getting a parking ticket on random days. A folding bike is ideal if you're living in a dorm room or a temporary apartment. Another benefits besides the low upfront cost, is the tremendous resale value many have, which means that you can recoup a lot of the bike's original cost when it's time to sell.
The electric bike is a new kind of two wheeler: Our customers talk—above all—about the sense of joy, excitement and fun the actual riding offers, about their fascination with the electric bike's unique ability to blend human and motor power, and that it offers most of the advantages of the regular bicycle and fewer of its shortcomings. The eBike—what is it uniquely?
“I am a big mountain biker and over the past couple years have taken a couple of electric folding bikes with me on various trips around the Southwest. I ride hard on the mountain bikes, then use the eFolders to get out and see the nooks and crannies of the town we are staying in … Mammoth Mountain, Big Bear Resort, Sedona, Springdale near Zion National Park, etc. I leave my truck in the parking lot and explore on the eFolder … after a hard day of riding the electric aspect is great … don’t have to worry about hills! Also the folding nature allows the bikes to transport easily, and store easily in the hotel or condo.”
Specializing in the sales of electric bikes and folding bikes since 1996. Offering a wide range of brands and models and a dedicated service department. We are here to help you find the right bike for your needs and to support you with confidence and competence. Come in for free test rides and experience all that electric bikes and folding bikes can do for you!
As with any purchase, ask yourself how you plan to use the bike and try to find the one that matches your needs best. Remember that you often get what you pay for and that a lower-quality bike may make you wish you had bought a better bike in the first place. The better quality folding bikes may seem expensive, but considering that a typical non-folding bike takes up 20 square feet in an apartment, you'll save perhaps $10,000 over ten years by being able to get a slightly smaller apartment. So you can't afford not to buy a good-quality folding bike.
In theory, you’re supposed to be able to push the bike when it’s folded, keeping the seat raised so that you can steer with it, but I found doing this to be more cumbersome than it was worth. Like most of these bikes, the Mariner D8 was awkward to carry one-handed in my tests. Folding-bike expert Steven Huang’s pro tip is to keep the folding bike open and turn it around so that you can rest the seat atop your shoulder for easier carrying, especially up and down stairs.
Lightweight folding bikes: Of course, if you intend to be hoisting the bike on and off trains, then it’s understandable that you want it to be light. This can be achieved though using a lighter frame material. Brompton have recently introduced titanium to their range and there are brands making carbon folders. Higher quality components will also reduce the weight, as will opting for fewer gears – such as a singlespeed version – but this will only really suit someone who doesn’t intend to come across many hills in their use of the bike.
But with prices ranging from a few hundred to many thousands of pounds, it pays to do your homework before choosing what’s best for your requirements. We took a range of folding bikes out in central London, on to commuter trains and into the depths of suburbia in order to ascertain which is best folding bike in each category. And if you'd prefer a little electric boost for your commute, have a look at our guide to the best electric bikes.
There’s a reason the chunky, quirky Brompton is ubiquitous on today’s urban roads: it does the job remarkably well. Tough, easy to carry (the M6L weighs in at 11.7 kilograms) and well constructed, the London company’s bikes have barely changed since the early 1980s. Once you’ve mastered the tricksy folding process, the Brompton can be stowed into the smallest of nooks within 20 seconds. Its folded dimensions are an impressive 53cm x 59cm x 29cm – but being the tiniest folder also means tiny components – 16-inch wheels and narrow handlebars take some getting used to. Steering is super sensitive and you have to be on alert for potholes. But for those with space issues in their lives, a short-to-medium distance to cover and an appreciation of solid, reliable engineering, this remains the leader of the pack. We’ve chosen the raw, smokey 2018 Black Edition for its handsome industrial sheen, but Brompton offers a wide range of colourways and collabs, not to mention its impressive 2017-released Electric model, to suit all tastes.
Not only will you struggle to get the B.O.B to the top of steep hills, it does not have safe braking power for the way down and is not stable at higher speeds. The B.O.B comes complete with fenders, a chain guard, and a kickstand, making it ready for you to commute in any weather. Where it really shines is the ease that it can be folded, as well as the light weight.
Another system found on folders, such as Montague Bikes, utilizes the seat tube as a pivot point for the frame to fold. This system uses a tube within a tube design to give the bike more torsional stiffness. It allows the user to fold the bike without "breaking" any vital tubes down, thus preserving the structural integrity of the diamond frame. This system is operated by a single quick release found along the top tube of the bike.
The Mariner D8 comes with fenders and a rear rack that has a nicely designed clip-on bungee cord so you don’t have to buy or hunt for something else to use; for my eight-block ride home, it held a 4-pound bag of dog food securely in place. If you plan to use panniers with the Mariner D8’s rear rack, Dahon recommends using front panniers, which are usually smaller, to avoid heel strike when you’re pedaling; if you want to try using larger panniers on the rack, we recommend taking the bike with you while shopping, or at least taking careful measurements. The D8 also has bolt holes for a front carrier attachment, should you prefer to outfit it with a so-designed front bag or basket.
At nearly 29 pounds, the Link D8 is heavier than many of the bikes we tested, including our top pick, the Dahon Mariner; this Tern model also has a larger folded footprint (the Link D8 is nearly 3 inches wider than the Mariner). In my tests, when the bike was folded the handlebars kind of dangled, even when I “secured” them with the rubber strap; I found that if it was on too tight a notch, the balance of the folded bike was off and the whole thing was liable to tumble over. This bike is outfitted with a twist shifter (not as good at the trigger one on the Mariner D8), which, weirdly, has the gears in the opposite order of every other bike we tested—as an owner, you’d no doubt get used to it, but it was definitely an odd adjustment for us to make when we were testing bikes en masse.

I’ve been riding bikes around New York City for more than a decade and commuting regularly from Astoria to Manhattan via the Queensboro Bridge to my job as a personal trainer and fitness instructor. In addition, I was formerly a staff writer for the Good Housekeeping Institute, where I was intimately involved with the scientific testing of all manner of products for the magazine and website.
Finally, Brompton bikes are customizable, which means you can choose the frame material (steel or a superlight combination of steel and titanium); the handlebar shape (four options); the number of gears (one, two, three, or six) and the gear ratios (three choices); the suspension type; the tire type; the saddle type and height; accessories such as the fenders, rack, front bags, and lights; and the paint color. A single-speed Brompton starts at about $1,200; the one we tested, the S6L, came outfitted with sport-style straight handlebars, six speeds ($220 more), fenders ($80 more), a front carrier block for attaching a bag and a front flap bag ($185 for both, bag not shown), and rechargeable battery-powered lights ($110, not shown), totaling about $1,795.

Another type of electric assist motor, often referred to as the mid-drive system, is increasing in popularity. With this system, the electric motor is not built into the wheel but is usually mounted near (often under) the bottom bracket shell. In more typical configurations, a cog or wheel on the motor drives a belt or chain that engages with a pulley or sprocket fixed to one of the arms of the bicycle's crankset. Thus the propulsion is provided at the pedals rather than at the wheel, being eventually applied to the wheel via the bicycle's standard drive train.

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