after recently reviewing the price of its bolt mini electric bike jetson, the affordable electric vehicle company, is giving black friday shoppers a little extra discount. already on sale for $399, between november 25th – 29th you can grab it for just $319. alternatively, a larger model like the jetson metro folding electric bike priced at $799, will be on sale for $639.

This eco-friendly bike is completely electric and emissions-free. If you care about the environment but still want to enjoy easy commuting, consider this bike. The Swagatron SwagCycle uses a 36V battery and a 250W motor that allow you to go up to 10mph. The battery takes about 2.5 hours to charge, and you can go up to 10 miles before having to recharge it. The frame is made of aerospace grade aluminum and folds into a compact size. It’s ideal if you struggle with storage space since it can fit pretty much anywhere. The handlebar display shows you the battery life and allows you to honk the horn, turn on the headlight, and brake and accelerate. One of the coolest things about this bike is that it features a USB charging port for charging all your gadgets and devices. However, note that this bike doesn’t have any pedal assist mode. Also, SwagCycle comes with a battery charger and user instructions that help you with the assembly.
Controllers for brushless motors: E-bikes require high initial torque and therefore models that use brushless motors typically have Hall sensor commutation for speed and angle measurement. An electronic controller provides assistance as a function of the sensor inputs, the vehicle speed and the required force. The controllers generally allow input by means of potentiometer or Hall Effect twist grip (or thumb-operated lever throttle), closed-loop speed control for precise speed regulation, protection logic for over-voltage, over-current and thermal protection. Bikes with a pedal assist function typically have a disc on the crank shaft featuring a ring of magnets coupled with a Hall sensor giving rise to a series of pulses, the frequency of which is proportional to pedaling speed. The controller uses pulse width modulation to regulate the power to the motor. Sometimes support is provided for regenerative braking but infrequent braking and the low mass of bicycles limits recovered energy. An implementation is described in an application note for a 200 W, 24 V Brushless DC (BLDC) motor.[43]
Prodeco technologies have made an amazing and stylish electric bike. It is created with very high technology. The battery goes up to 720 watts which makes it more reliable. It can go 28-36 mph. The body is covered with lithium powder that makes it rust resistant. The material used is very lightweight and allows easy portability. It is easily foldable. The design of this electric bike is high-class. You will love going to different places and showing off your new and classy bike.
Brussels-based Ahooga picked up a prestigious Red Dot design award earlier in 2018 for this hybrid bike, which pairs design simplicity with a little added oomph from a 250W rear hub electric motor. Weighing in at 13kg including battery, it’s light enough ride as normal but with the electrical assistance as an luxury extra. The Style+ model comes with leather anatomical Saddle, Wolfy pedals, puncture-resistant Schwalbe Marathon Plus tyres and a pair of rather natty roll-open mudguards. But perhaps the biggest draw with this handsome model is its colour options – there are 215 to choose from, in matt or glossy finish.
The two most common types of hub motors used in electric bicycles are brushed and brushless. Many configurations are available, varying in cost and complexity; direct-drive and geared motor units are both used. An electric power-assist system may be added to almost any pedal cycle using chain drive, belt drive, hub motors or friction drive. BLDC hub motors are a common modern design. The motor is built into the wheel hub itself, and the stator fixed solidly to the axle, and the magnets attached to and rotating with the wheel. The bicycle wheel hub is the motor. The power levels of motors used are influenced by available legal categories and are often, but not always limited to under 750 watts.
The number of gears specced on your new machine will be important too. If you expect to keep your journeys to flat city streets, a singlespeed (just one gear) will cut down on maintenance and overall weight. However, those who expect to ride hilly terrain will be pleased to hear that there are plenty of folding bikes that come supplied with triple chainsets and 11-32 wide ratio cassettes. This will offer an easier ride on the inclines, but will add to the weight.
Great bike, especially for the price. After a few minor glitches, but working with an excellent customer service rep from Amazon, Gregg, we received the bike (basket had to be shipped later, it didn't come with it originally but all worked out well). I've used this several times, speed reaches 25 mph, powerful bike, can't believe the price. Easy to handle, I have no problems whatsoever with the kickstand but if it has to be physically carried, I let my husband do it, but as for getting it off the kickstand or back on, I have no issues. The only thing I didn't like was the seat, I found it to be uncomfortable so switched seats and bought a great sheepskin cover on Amazon for it. I don't know how long the charge will last, I've only used it a few miles at a time but no loss of power ... full review

E-bikes are classed according to the power that their electric motor can deliver and the control system, i.e., when and how the power from the motor is applied. Also the classification of e-bikes is complicated as much of the definition is due to legal reasons of what constitutes a bicycle and what constitutes a moped or motorcycle. As such, the classification of these e-bikes varies greatly across countries and local jurisdictions.


E-bike usage worldwide has experienced rapid growth since 1998. In 2016 there were 210 million electric bikes worldwide used daily.[33] It is estimated that there were roughly 120 million e-bikes in China in early 2010, and sales are expanding rapidly in India, the United States of America, Germany, the Netherlands,[2] and Switzerland.[34] A total of 700,000 e-bikes were sold in Europe in 2010, up from 200,000 in 2007 and 500,000 units in 2009.[35]
The Metro has front and rear disc brakes, and a guard to keep your pants from getting caught in the chain. It only has one gear, but it capably made its way up a 20-degree hill near my house on level 3 assist. The display measures how much battery you have left, depending on how hard the motor is working, but I found its accuracy suspect. It's a little disconcerting to see the battery level fluctuate so rapidly. Wait, do I have 51 percent battery, or 14 percent? Only time will tell!

This electric powered mountain bike runs on a 300 watt rear motor that gives it all the power it needs. The battery is lithium which adds to the long battery life. The electric bike has an all-aluminum frame and wheels that make the bike incredibly durable, this adds to its strength. The hydraulic shocks and off-road tires provide incredible grip and traction.

German designers Heiko Müller and Markus Riese began working on the Birdy in 1992 for their university thesis – the first model comprised of parts of two old bicycles welded together. Fast forward 26 years and the Weiterstadt-based company have mastered the art of folding bikes. With 18-inch wheels for a more stable ride than the Brompton, the Birdy City offers impressive stability and comfort, and its aggressive, sporty geometry means it’s faster than many of its competitors. At 12.8kg, it’s not the lightest model around, but if you’re happy to take that hit in favour of a superior ride it won’t let you down. Eight-speed hub gear, front suspension/rear shocks, disc brakes adjustable-height handlebars and optional rear rollers all tick the right boxes, and although it’s not the smallest fold, it only takes 20 seconds or so to pack it down for the train or trunk.

I wanted to love the Bike Friday Pakit, which is available for order with a custom-made frame. It has a unique fold (a sort of cross between those of the Brompton and the Birdy, with the rear tire rotating under), and with the front tire and the handlebar mast removed, you can pack it into an oversized backpack and bring it almost anywhere, even on a plane. It’s also the only bike we tested that can accommodate more petite riders (kids or little people) from 4-foot-5. But although it’s made in Oregon of good components—a Shimano Claris derailleur, Schwalbe tires—our testers thought it somehow felt less secure on the road, and the fenders I ordered kept rubbing on the front tire and getting caught on curbs. (If you go with the Pakit, don’t get the fenders.)
The interesting part of the pedal assist system in the Oyama is that it can really sense when it is needed. The hardest part of pedaling is starting from a dead stop, and that’s precisely when the pedal assist was providing the most power. I could feel it start to taper off as I passed through 10 mph (16 km/h) or so, but by that point I had sufficient momentum that I only needed a gentle boost from the motor to help maintain higher speeds.

MIT graduate David Montague launched his folding-bike business in 1987 and counts the US Marines among its previous clients. The Massachusetts-based company offers a wide range of full-sized folders, but we went for this entry-level model for its stripped-back simplicity. The smart choice for commuters with longer journeys to the station (or those who simply have issues with smaller bikes), the 10.8-kilogram Boston comes in 17- or 19-inch frame options, with 700c alloy wheels, which allow for steady, speedy riding over medium distances. The folding system – essentially a bi-fold but for full-sized bikes – does a great job crunching the size down to a reasonable 90cm x 48cm x 30cm for stowing on trains or car boots, but the front wheel needs to be removed – albeit via a quick-release system – which delays the process by a few seconds.
The interesting part of the pedal assist system in the Oyama is that it can really sense when it is needed. The hardest part of pedaling is starting from a dead stop, and that’s precisely when the pedal assist was providing the most power. I could feel it start to taper off as I passed through 10 mph (16 km/h) or so, but by that point I had sufficient momentum that I only needed a gentle boost from the motor to help maintain higher speeds.

It makes a lot of sense to put these two technologies together. You can get all the advantages of an electric bike in an easy to transport package. An electric folding bike really is the ultimate solution for commuting. You can let the battery do the hard work and not worry about getting sweaty as you scoot across town to a meeting, or you can arrive at the office faster than with just leg power alone. If part of your journey necessitates taking a train or a bus, all you have to do is fold up the bike and hop on.

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