Not only that, the foldability and light weight of these bikes can help you prevent theft – which is a huge problem in most cities. Instead of locking your bike up outside and leaving enterprising thieves to consider the best way of stealing it, you can simply fold it up and take it with you – to the office, grocery store, wherever you may be. No fretting about whether or not you bike will be there when you get back from your errands.

 Commuting Made Easy – Commuting is made easier as the foldable electric bikes do not require much space for parking and can be easily folded and carried through train or bus stations anywhere. The major benefit of a power bike is that there are no more traffic problems. You can easily cruise through due to its speed and when you see a traffic jam just fold it and start walking through the jammed passage. Moreover, the speed of this bike can get you to your destination in less time. No more being late.

The rack and fenders make the Navigator a solid choice for daily commuting or light touring. The Octagon stem is also adjustable without tools, so it’s easy to dial in a comfortable fit. At 29-pounds, the Navigator is a bit less portable than some other folding options, but the full-sized wheels make it a great choice for longer rides and commutes. Price: $959.
After a very wait, Brompton finally announced its first electric bike in 2017. The Brompton electric has the same design and folded size as non-electric Brompton folders. The differences are the motor on the front wheel and a 300Wh battery bag clipped on the front luggage block. These additional parts make the bicycle heavier at 30.2 lbs for the 2-speed version.

Many folding frames follow the classic frame pattern of the safety bicycle's diamond frame, but feature a hinge point (with single or double hinges) allowing the bicycle to fold approximately in half. Quick-release clamps enable raising or lowering steering and seat columns. A similar swing hinge may be combined with a folding steering column. Fold designs may use larger wheels, even the same size as in non-folders, for users prioritizing ride over fold compactness. Bikes that use this kind of fold include, Dahon, and Montague, and Tern.

Hello, I live in a small apartment and was wondering what type of folder you would recommend for me. I’ve recently retired and have health problems which include Diabetes 2, irregular heartbeat, and a weakened left leg from polio as a child. I would like to take the bike to the store, post office, around town to shop, and to pay bills. I would eventually like to travel up to 6 miles but for right now 3 would do. There are a number of mounds or hills and one steep one that I avoid by jumping in the car when I have an errand to run over there. Do you think battery powered electric bikes would be more suitable. It would make climbing a mound possible without having to demount and walk. Perhaps, there’s a non-pedelec that would work that you about which you know. I’m nearly 250 pounds and 5 feet 6 inches tall and quite out-of-shape. I would like to sit closer to the ground in case of a fall or injury, maybe out of fear, due to the weakened leg muscles. By the way I live in a tourist town that is well-known for its climate, the Boardwalk and its university-Santa Cruz, California. I’m not sure how many gears/speed the bike should have, especially for the purposes of climbing hills. Forgot to mention I’m 67 years old soon to be 68. Please provide me with a couple of choices you think might work. Don’t know if a full-size would be better but I like the stand-over position of a folder as I worry about that bar of the frame being there and complicating a fall.
Bought the vika plus and have been riding it around town. Love the sturdy feel and build quality of the bikes. Handles are firm, leather and shaped well. The lcd screen is clear and legible and lights up in the dark. All the controls are easy to use Even though it is a foldable bike, it feels like a one piece bike. Response to pedaling is quick and strong, you get ip to max speed of almost 20 mph really easily. Looking forward to many more miles of assisted biking
The biggest risk in backing this campaign, like most crowdfunding projects, is long-term support. The company offers a 24/7 help desk and the ability to video conference with a mechanic on complicated matters. It also offers a two-year global warranty on the important stuff. But that requires the company to exist long enough to honor it. I think that’s likely, but it’s a risk you need to weigh. Fortunately, Mate Bikes are designed to be serviced by local bicycle shops, and the electronics can be swapped out easily thanks to the liberal use of cable connectors (if the LCD breaks, for example, you can quickly unplug it and swap in a new unit).
We’ve updated the section on our upgrade pick, the Brompton S6L, to include information about Brompton’s recent voluntary recall. The company says that the recall is more of a safety precaution than a reaction to reported injuries or experiences of compromised quality. We’re still confident that the Brompton S6L is the best upgrade choice for a folding bike.
Tough tyres with a good level of puncture protection are often high on the agenda for commuters who want to limit the time they spend fixing flats. Check what rubber is fitted to the rims of your would-be bike if that’s you. Schwalbe and Kenda are popular manufacturers of small diameter tyres for folding bikes, and most will be 1.75-2 inches wide – offering plenty of grip thanks to a wide volume and thus increased contact patch with the tarmac when compared to traditional road tyres.

Tackle your daily commute with ease or go for a weekend cruise in style with the Gazelle CityZen T10 e-bike. And don’t worry about those thigh-burning hills; the Bosch motor offers four assist levels—Eco, Tour, Range Sport, Turbo—making hills a breeze and the Lithium-Ion battery provides a range of up to 85 miles in Eco mode. The bike is one of the first to use Bosch's new integrated battery, which is concealed in the downtube. The matte black paint and classic, step-through design give a classic look while fenders, pannier racks, and integrated lights add practical functionality. The bike is easy to maneuver in city streets, but still has assist up to 28mph so you can cover a lot of miles and power up steep hills. There's a suspension fork too. It's not at the level of something you'd find on a mountain bike (or even some better e-bikes) but it takes the edge of some potholes and curbs.


Crowdfunding is a chaotic field by nature: companies looking for funding tend to make big promises. According to a study run by Kickstarter in 2015, roughly 1 in 10 “successful” products that reach their funding goals fail to actually deliver rewards. Of the ones that do deliver, delays, missed deadlines, or overpromised ideas mean that there’s often disappointment in store for those products that do get done.
For some shoppers, the number-one criterion is how small a bike can get. The Brompton S6L elegantly transforms into a package that shaves 3 inches off the height, 2 inches off the width, and 8 inches off the length of the folded Mariner (and even more off the dimensions of the Tern models), making for an easier carry. Even so, it manages an “I’m almost riding a full-size bike” experience on the road. The handlebars, gearing, frame type, accessories, cargo options, and paint job are all customizable—for a price. (Our six-speed test bike, as it came to us, retailed for about $1,800 at the time of our review.)
For some shoppers, the number-one criterion is how small a bike can get. The Brompton S6L elegantly transforms into a package that shaves 3 inches off the height, 2 inches off the width, and 8 inches off the length of the folded Mariner (and even more off the dimensions of the Tern models), making for an easier carry. Even so, it manages an “I’m almost riding a full-size bike” experience on the road. The handlebars, gearing, frame type, accessories, cargo options, and paint job are all customizable—for a price. (Our six-speed test bike, as it came to us, retailed for about $1,800 at the time of our review.)
By 1898 a rear-wheel drive electric bicycle, which used a driving belt along the outside edge of the wheel, was patented by Mathew J. Steffens. Also, the 1899 U.S. Patent 627,066 by John Schnepf depicted a rear-wheel friction “roller-wheel” style drive electric bicycle.[7] Schnepf's invention was later re-examined and expanded in 1969 by G.A. Wood Jr. with his U.S. Patent 3,431,994. Wood’s device used 4 fractional horsepower motors; connected through a series of gears.[8]
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